Steampunk literature

By Nimue Brown

Isambard Kerne may be an Edwardian gentleman rather than a Victorian, but there are many reasons the Windsmith series ticks the boxes as Steampunk literature. It’s not just the goggles on the hat. Dieselpunk, a significant sub-culture within Steampunk (as I see it, others may see it differently!) covers this era anyway.

We’re in the early stages of flying when Isambard makes the ill fated journey that marks the beginning of his otherwordly adventures. A later title in the series – The Well Under The Sea brings together historical figures who are influences on modern Steampunk. Willful anachronism and playing with history abound, all manner of things get airborne for purposes of adventure and discovery. Magic and technology meet and co-operate… if you love the things that underpin Steampunk, then this is a series to relish.

 

I’ve been actively involved with Steampunk for years now, it’s been a great joy luring Kevan Manwaring out to events and introducing Steampunk folk to his writing. Photos in this blog were taken at the Steampunk market in Chepstow, April 2017.

The merry crew – author and windsmith Kevan Manwaring left, James Colvin 2nd from left, (explorer and reprobate), Tom Brown (illustrator and tea pirate, spoons at the ready) Nimue Brown on the right, (blogger, author, somewhat threatened by this new fangled photographic technology).

Start the Windsmith series here – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Long-Woman-Windsmith-Elegy/dp/1906900442

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